NOTE: You must be prompt and present for the course – participation in the full two days is required. Any time missed will result in certificates not being issued.

DAY ONE OF WORKSHOP:

The majority of those who access the shelter system are people who have experienced trauma. Some have been victims of abuse (physical, emotional, spiritual or sexual), been involved in wars and civil conflict or witnessed violence. For some others, there has been the trauma of relocation, living on the streets or separation from family or culture. Many clients will have histories of trauma that started in childhood. A significant portion of the homeless population suffers from complex trauma – meaning that they have experienced severe trauma of one or more kinds. While many theories see dysfunctional behaviour as something that needs to be changed or extinguished, trauma theory explains behaviour as adaptive and protective. When working with trauma based behaviour, understanding the function of the behaviour will allow staff to design more effective interventions.

 

Learning Objectives:

Participants will have a working understanding of:

  • Child Development, Brain Development and function, Trauma and Attachment Theory.
  • Simple versus Complex Trauma and the potential implications for mental and physical health, socialization, ability to perform and sustain relationships (with individuals and institutions), self-regulation and spirituality.
  • Trauma based triggers and reactivity – clients’ and staff.
  • Power and Control – how institutions can inadvertently mirror abusive dynamics and re-traumatize.

 

DAY TWO OF WORKSHOP:

The majority of those who access the shelter system are people who have experienced trauma. Some have been victims of abuse (physical, emotional, spiritual or sexual), been involved in wars and civil conflict or witnessed violence. For some others, there has been the trauma of relocation, living on the streets or separation from family or culture. Many clients will have histories of trauma that started in childhood. A significant portion of the homeless population suffers from complex trauma – meaning that they have experienced severe trauma of one or more kinds. While many theories see dysfunctional behaviour as something that needs to be changed or extinguished, trauma theory explains behaviour as adaptive and protective. When working with trauma based behaviour, understanding the function of the behaviour will allow staff to design more effective interventions.

 

Learning Objectives:

Participants will have a working understanding of:

  • Child Development, Brain Development and function, Trauma and Attachment Theory.
  • Simple versus Complex Trauma and the potential implications for mental and physical health, socialization, ability to perform and sustain relationships (with individuals and institutions), self-regulation and spirituality.
  • Trauma based triggers and reactivity – clients’ and staff.
  • Power and Control – how institutions can inadvertently mirror abusive dynamics and re-traumatize.

 

FACILITATOR NANCY N. MAYER has worked in the field for 38 years. She has developed her expertise as a clinician, supervisor, trainer and consultant in the areas of child sexual abuse, adult survivors of trauma, secondary trauma, clergy misconduct and abuse, workplace issues and organizational change and development. She has worked and managed in both unionized and non-unionized settings. In her clinical practice, Nancy provides services to individuals, couples and families, and specialized services for adults and adolescents who have experienced childhood abuse, trauma, illness or loss. She provides clinical services and training to mental health professionals on issues related to secondary trauma, countertransference and workplace stress. She runs ongoing consultation groups for staff who work with traumatized populations and teaches and trains.